Review by detroitgolfer of Moortown Golf Club

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General impression7.0
Moortown Golf Club Moortown Golf Club7.5
Course maintenance7.0
Clubhouse7.0
Value for money6.5
Hospitality6.0
Surroundings6.0
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7.1
About the review
Written on: 14 April 2022Played on: 23 September 2016Handicap while playing: 14.7
detroitgolfer review

It is a little recognized fact that Yorkshire is the site of the first and last pure British and Irish Ryder Cup victories. The home side was successful at Moortown 1929 and Lindrick in 1957. Sandwiched between these victories was a Hogan led team which came from behind to win the 1948 matches in a war ravished England. It is also little known that Alwoodley turned down the invitation to host the 1933 Ryder Cup which was a squeaker win for Britain at Southport and Ainsdale. The Ryder Cup Matches have a long and cherished history and no club celebrates this legacy in quite the same manner as Moortown. The entrance drive, hall and Dining Room are given over to the historic 1929 Matches. It is also fitting that the creator of Moortown is memorialized in the MacKenzie Bar. More concentrated and single designer focused than the 3 Ws, it wasn’t all that long ago that four courses designed by Dr MacKenzie were in close proximity (one could easily walk the distances to the front gates with clubs in tow) just north of Leeds. In 1970 Moor Allerton sold its land for housing and moved further north and now plays over a Robert Trent-Jones Senior course. Moortown, Alwoodley and Sand Moor remain on their original plots. All three courses have been altered somewhat, but Moortown and Sand Moor did so to accommodate the ever increasing growth of Leeds. However, Moortown remains overwhelmingly a Dr MacKenzie design. In recent years the club engaged Ken Moodie to work on the course. The original idea was to rebuild two greens, but the job eventually turned into a complete bunker restoration project incorporating new bunkering for three holes built in the 1980s and some added bunkers here and there to test flat bellies. While many know much about MacKenzie, it is worth noting his meteoric rise in golf. From humble beginnings as a founding member of Alwoodley in 1907 to designing an iconic course (Alwoodley) in the same year and a host course of the Ryder Cup in 1909 (after using Gibraltar as a means to recruit members) to winning the Country Life Lido Prize in 1914 and becoming an R&A member by 1915 is remarkable by any standard. Even with this sort of talent and resume, few would have predicted the even greater accomplishments MacKenzie would achieve before his death in 1934. While hosting the 1929 Ryder Cup is undoubtedly Moortown’s feather in the cap, the club has been the venue for many high level professional and amateur events. Many will remember the Car Care tour event in the mid-80s. The 1984 event was notably won by Nick Faldo at +2 for the week. Well prior to the development of the European Tour, Moortown hosted the prestigious Yorkshire Evening News Professional Tournament on 19 occasions. The year of the 1929 Ryder Cup was won by American Joe Turnesa. Major amateur events too are well represented at Moortown with five Brabazon Trophies (the most recent in 2009) and a scattering of English Amateurs. Suffice it to say that Moortown has remained relevant as a championship venue and the recent work will ensure this trend continues. MacKenzie claimed to have never seen or heard of the Redan at North Berwick before constructing Gibraltar. Considering the visual differences of the two holes this revelation isn't surprising. Quite famously, it is said MacKenzie negotiated with the club to build one public relations hole to lure new members to the club and thus raise the capital to build a course. If ever there was a hole which could be used to recruit members, Gibraltar is it. Built on a rocky slope, the use of the terrain is a masterclass in design. Without a dud in the pack, there are many standout holes spread throughout a very handsome property. The 2nd,6th,8th,10th,12th,15,16th and 18th spring to mind. While Moortown is certainly challenging as +1 for the 2016 Open Qualifying can attest, it also remains a fun course to play in no small measure due to its width. Moortown is much more than the course next door to Alwoodley and is well worth the effort of a visit.

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Helpful?
detroitgolfer
detroitgolfer
4395 points
Silver
713 / 133,107
worldwide
5 / 4,732
United Kingdom
Total number of reviews:
34
Average review score:
7.6
Total number of photos added:
132
Handicap:
14.7
Member since:
8 April 2022
Home course :
7.1
About the review
Written on: 14 April 2022Played on: 23 September 2016Handicap while playing: 14.7
General impression7.0
Moortown Golf Club Moortown Golf Club7.5
Course maintenance7.0
Clubhouse7.0
Value for money6.5
Hospitality6.0
Surroundings6.0
detroitgolfer review

It is a little recognized fact that Yorkshire is the site of the first and last pure British and Irish Ryder Cup victories. The home side was successful at Moortown 1929 and Lindrick in 1957. Sandwiched between these victories was a Hogan led team which came from behind to win the 1948 matches in a war ravished England. It is also little known that Alwoodley turned down the invitation to host the 1933 Ryder Cup which was a squeaker win for Britain at Southport and Ainsdale. The Ryder Cup Matches have a long and cherished history and no club celebrates this legacy in quite the same manner as Moortown. The entrance drive, hall and Dining Room are given over to the historic 1929 Matches. It is also fitting that the creator of Moortown is memorialized in the MacKenzie Bar. More concentrated and single designer focused than the 3 Ws, it wasn’t all that long ago that four courses designed by Dr MacKenzie were in close proximity (one could easily walk the distances to the front gates with clubs in tow) just north of Leeds. In 1970 Moor Allerton sold its land for housing and moved further north and now plays over a Robert Trent-Jones Senior course. Moortown, Alwoodley and Sand Moor remain on their original plots. All three courses have been altered somewhat, but Moortown and Sand Moor did so to accommodate the ever increasing growth of Leeds. However, Moortown remains overwhelmingly a Dr MacKenzie design. In recent years the club engaged Ken Moodie to work on the course. The original idea was to rebuild two greens, but the job eventually turned into a complete bunker restoration project incorporating new bunkering for three holes built in the 1980s and some added bunkers here and there to test flat bellies. While many know much about MacKenzie, it is worth noting his meteoric rise in golf. From humble beginnings as a founding member of Alwoodley in 1907 to designing an iconic course (Alwoodley) in the same year and a host course of the Ryder Cup in 1909 (after using Gibraltar as a means to recruit members) to winning the Country Life Lido Prize in 1914 and becoming an R&A member by 1915 is remarkable by any standard. Even with this sort of talent and resume, few would have predicted the even greater accomplishments MacKenzie would achieve before his death in 1934. While hosting the 1929 Ryder Cup is undoubtedly Moortown’s feather in the cap, the club has been the venue for many high level professional and amateur events. Many will remember the Car Care tour event in the mid-80s. The 1984 event was notably won by Nick Faldo at +2 for the week. Well prior to the development of the European Tour, Moortown hosted the prestigious Yorkshire Evening News Professional Tournament on 19 occasions. The year of the 1929 Ryder Cup was won by American Joe Turnesa. Major amateur events too are well represented at Moortown with five Brabazon Trophies (the most recent in 2009) and a scattering of English Amateurs. Suffice it to say that Moortown has remained relevant as a championship venue and the recent work will ensure this trend continues. MacKenzie claimed to have never seen or heard of the Redan at North Berwick before constructing Gibraltar. Considering the visual differences of the two holes this revelation isn't surprising. Quite famously, it is said MacKenzie negotiated with the club to build one public relations hole to lure new members to the club and thus raise the capital to build a course. If ever there was a hole which could be used to recruit members, Gibraltar is it. Built on a rocky slope, the use of the terrain is a masterclass in design. Without a dud in the pack, there are many standout holes spread throughout a very handsome property. The 2nd,6th,8th,10th,12th,15,16th and 18th spring to mind. While Moortown is certainly challenging as +1 for the 2016 Open Qualifying can attest, it also remains a fun course to play in no small measure due to its width. Moortown is much more than the course next door to Alwoodley and is well worth the effort of a visit.

clubs_1
clubs_1
clubs_1
clubs_1
Helpful?
detroitgolfer
detroitgolfer
4395 points
Silver
713 / 133,107
worldwide
5 / 4,732
United Kingdom
Total number of reviews:
34
Average review score:
7.6
Total number of photos added:
132
Handicap:
14.7
Member since:
8 April 2022
Home course :
Ready to rate your golf experience?
Rating your experience helps golfers make the right choice and assists clubs to improve their services. Need more incentive? Reviews are added to your personal golf logbook and you even have the chance to win great prizes!
write a review
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